Team Selection Considerations
How do you put a team together? What do you take into account when evaluating potential team  members?
Physical Fitness -  As individuals, each team member must have the requisite physical fitness to  be able to walk for 8 to 9  hours per day, and  cover approximately 20 to 25 km daily over varying  terrain while carrying a backpack weighing up to  20kg. In certain areas there are footpaths used by  Lesotho herdsman and traders, in most areas, no footpaths at  all. The  terrain is definitely not flat.  The trail is principally a sequence of ascents and descents, some gentle and some steep.  When  contouring  to maintain height, this is often down walking along a sloping surface without a path  and this can place  stress on knees and feet. 
Mental Fitness - The ability to persevere regardless of the weather, personal pain, or fatigue, and  with due consideration to  the impact of  one's  own performance on the group as a whole. The  group is only as fast as the slowest member. This is a  hike with few choices. The hills wont go  away, the weather will be what it is. Starting the hike, each member must  be  mentally prepared to  take what comes. 
Maturity - A team is merely a collection of individuals. Group function  depends on the individual  attitudes of each member.  The team is to be  together for 12 days or so and each member must  manage his own  thoughts and behaviour to minimise  the negative impact on the group  and  maximise the chances of successfully completing the hike. The best definition I  know of maturity  is the ability to adapt one's behaviour  (not  value system) to maximise the potential for positive  outcomes  in a  relationship. Once the team is put together and the hike starts, it is key that all  members demonstrate maturity in  their interactions and prevent unnecessary conflict and contain  disproportionate responses. Complaining does not change  reality, it merely creates additional  stress. Conflict between members does not contribute positively to group well being.
Group Size - There are some challenges logistically as group size increases. The larger the group,  the more difficult it may  become to ensure that all are ready to start on time in the mornings and  after tea or lunch breaks. Time spent waiting for  the team to regroup after climbs or slow sections  may also increase. Stress increases as the variance in individual  performance increase.  Organising support teams to carry up supplies also becomes difficult as more volunteers are  needed  for larger group support. Travel logistics is also impacted.
Our group of to six proved to be cohesive and easily  manageable. All  members had the maturity  needed and no-one was  short of  mental  fitness. For some, particularly myself, fitness improved  on the hike making it easier as we progressed  from day to day.