3. The Motivation
What drives people to spend 12 days trekking across the hills, sleeping in harsh conditions and  living off limited rations in unpredictable weather conditions?
Bragging Rights - As a team of average age exceeding 50, ego is not the major driver. "Got the T-  Shirt" is no longer a key concern.
What's Next - As with all activity, it gets easier if you keep doing the same  thing and every now  and then you must raise  the bar. The traverse is perceived as one of the most challenging hikes in  South Africa. After a number of completions of  the other major hikes what is the next challenge or  test.
Self Affirmation - For some, the ability to test one's endurance and fitness for the sole purpose of  saying "I'm still doing OK"  was a driver. (From  Wikipaedia ...The theory of self-affirmation is a  psychological theory that was first proposed by Claude  Steele (1988) with the premise that people  are motivated to maintain the integrity of the self. Its ultimate goal is to protect an image of its self-  integrity, moral and adequacy.)
Escape - To leave the day to day hurly burly of traffic, politics, crime and commercial pressures is  also a key driver. Not  touching a wallet or hearing  the dramatised news, and concerning oneself  only with basic daily considerations of where to  get water and where to camp is a prime motivation.
Habit - We live out roles we define for ourselves. Sometimes our preferred identity is best portrayed   by our outward  behaviour. Our chosen lifestyles become a habit that we practice.
A mixture of all of the above may apply. When asking each group member in our team why they  were doing the traverse,  there was little clear indication or reason of substance. Perhaps we still  don't know exactly why we do what we do.